My current business challenge: Providing the right solution at exactly the right time

It’s Thanksgiving, so this post will be a little different. I’m going to tell you all about what I’ve been up to with my business. If you’re curious about how I do things behind the scenes, this is for you 🙂

How my business works

My income comes from two primary sources: Salary Negotiation Coaching and product sales (Fearless Salary Negotiation books and courses). The coaching business is doing well—I’m happy with both the volume and quality of clients I get to work with. The product business has been doing alright, but I would like to grow that side of the business.

Obviously, selling more products means more revenue. That’s important since this is how I make my living.

But selling more products also means providing a valuable solution to an expensive problem (“How do I negotiate my salary without leaving anything on the table?” or “How do I get more job offers?”) at the right time. I like helping people, and it’s frustrating that lots of people get some of the help I have to offer while never knowing about other ways I can help from 1-on-1 coaching to a full-on step-by-step DIY guide to negotiating a job offer.

Slow and steady progress

My newsletter will cross 10,000 subscribers by the end of the week. I can hardly believe I just wrote that number. It seems crazy to me, especially considering my newsletter had only about 2,400 subscribers at the beginning of 2017.

The business-y way to describe that is, “My marketing efforts have been effective.” I mostly focus on content marketing—writing long, detailed articles designed to teach people how to do difficult things by following a process. Most of my newsletter subscribers found me through an article I wrote.

That’s the thing I’m best at, so that’s where I focus.

Where I need to get better is at articulating the value of salary negotiation and giving folks the the opportunity to buy products and services to help them negotiate higher salaries and get more job offers.

The business-y way to describe that is, “I need to get better at Sales.” On one hand, I feel a little uncomfortable saying that. On the other hand, “Sales” is a key part of any business.

The timing problem

My primary Sales challenge is that most of the people who find me are looking for a specific tool to negotiate their salary and they are on a very tight timeline to respond to a job offer.

I call this “The timing problem” because there’s such a small window between “job offer in hand” and “compensation package finalized”. For a long time, the challenge was simply enabling those people to find me when they need help. Over the past year or so, I’ve gotten pretty good at that part as I write better articles on salary negotiation and related topics (this is how I know my Marketing efforts are paying off).

The issue is that the folks who find my articles and other tools are in such a hurry to respond to their job offer that most of my advice gets to them after they’ve already finished negotiating. They may not even know that they could have purchased products or services to help with all other aspects of their negotiation and done even better (this is how I know I need to work on Sales).

My current focus

So once a new person finds Fearless Salary Negotiation by searching for help on a specific topic, I need to find a way to make it crystal clear that there’s a lot more help available, and I have to convey that message very quickly (in 24-48 hours or less).

I haven’t worked out the details, but I need to move faster and communicate more when new people find me. This is tough for me because I don’t want to bother people—I want to help them. I realize this sounds cheesy, but it’s true: If I were just trying to make money, I never would’ve quit my day job two years ago.

Instead of saying, “Here is a free thing to help a little bit, good luck!” and then waiting a day and saying, “Here’s a tip to help negotiate your salary” and then another day and “Here’s another tip!”, I need to do something more like:

Here is a free tool to help negotiate your salary – we’re going to move quickly because you probably have an offer in hand and there’s a lot I need to share with you. If you want help right now, here’s where to get it and here’s the monetary value of that help.

These are the key things to consider when negotiating your salary. I’m going to share insight into each of those things over the next few days. We’re going to move fast, so buckle up!

If I can figure this out, I’ll be able to help a lot more people get paid what they’re worth and my business will grow. This is the kind of challenge I love, and it’s why I do what I do.

So that’s where I’m at with my business. Now I’m off to bake a couple of pecan pies for Thanksgiving 🙂


PS Did you know you can give Fearless Salary Negotiation as a valuable career-boosting gift? It’s pretty easy, too! Just mark “Yes” when you see “Is this order a gift?” at check out! https://fearlesssalarynegotiation.com/get-started/

I bought this painting

My friend Rick is a an artist who I met in Charleston earlier this year when I went up there to run a 10k race. I was running the race with Rick’s son, so we all stayed at his house in Charleston while we were in town.

While we were staying at Rick’s house, I saw a painting that I really liked. I didn’t say much at the time because I wasn’t sure if it was ok to ask about buying art from an artists’ house.

But then Rick brought several of his pieces down to Gainesville for an art show, and that piece was among them. It was for sale, so I made an offer, which eventually turned into an agreement. I’m now the proud owner of this original piece:

Here’s the weird thing: It’s a mystery why I like this piece. Rick had lots of great pieces at the show, but this particular piece really speaks to me.

Why? Who knows!

All I know is that I saw it, liked it, and eventually bought it.

I used to think hiring managers felt this way about job candidates. They had a job to fill, they posted a job opening online, they got a stack of resumes, they talked to a few candidates, and one of the candidates just seemed like the right fit.

It seemed mysterious, almost magical.

But then I spent a year building a team of 25 Support Engineers, which meant reviewing scores of resumes and interviewing lots and lots of candidates.

The team we built was very good at what they did, and I learned there’s a very concrete, tactical side to interviewing, which is unlike evaluating a piece of art.

Let’s go back to something I said earlier:

“They had a job to fill, they posted a job description online, they got a stack of resumes…”

Did you catch that?

The hiring manager isn’t hoping for a mysterious connection with a piece of art. They’re hoping to find a candidate with attributes clearly articulated in their job description. They want a candidate who can help the company or team meet its goals and overcome challenges they’re experiencing.

With a job description and a little research, you can position yourself as the candidate for a specific job. It’s almost like you can peer into their mind to figure out what sort of art they’ll like so you can present it right back to them.

Interviewing can be intimidating, but it isn’t mysterious. Your goal in your interviews is to make sure they know that you are that person they’re looking for.

My comprehensive guide to answering interview questions shows you how to position yourself as the candidate they want to hire. Even if you’re not interviewing right now, you should bookmark this for later. And if you know someone who has job interviews coming up, do them a favor and send them this link:

>> Click here to read my guide to crushing your job interviews

Take advantage of the Summer lull

I live in Gainesville, FL, which is a college town featuring the University of Florida. And I would be remiss if I didn’t include this to celebrate our first College World Series National Championship: Go Gators!

But enough about how great it is to be a Florida Gator. Let me tell you about my #SummerOfFun.

Gainesville is a strange place because more than half of the city disappears every summer as students head home for summer break. All of a sudden the traffic dissipates, restaurant wait times collapse, and we locals have free reign for a few months.

This also means that most organized activities stop during the summer, and we’re left to our own devices when it comes to leisure time.

Fortunately, a few of my friends have pretty serious FOMO, which means we do something pretty much every night. Here are a few of the things we’ve done so far this summer:

  • Watched the NBA finals
  • Watched the NHL finals
  • Played Spades (we only got through like half a game before we…)
  • Played King of Tokyo, which is extremely fun and you should play it although I can’t ever seem to win (UPDATE: Winnar!)
  • Watched John Wick 2 (exactly what you’d expect)
  • Played Scattergories (Winnar!)
  • Played Cranium (Two-time Winnar!)

It’s a lot of fun. And that’s just a partial list from the past couple weeks—we’re only about half way home.

I realize your summer probably doesn’t quite look like my #SummerOfFun. But I do have a point!

Summers are different

There’s a distinct shift in tone and energy during the summer. Personally, this means #SummerOfFun ramps up for me. Professionally, I’ve noticed a similar lull as things just move more slowly.

People go on vacation. Deadlines become malleable. The office gets quieter.

It’s the perfect time to slow down and recuperate, and it’s a great time think about your plan for the rest of the year.

It’s hard to stop and take time to think about your career and what you’ll accomplish next. But the summer lull makes it a little easier to step back and make a plan.

Take advantage of the summer lull

This summer, take some time to do a little market research to see if your salary is in line for your industry. Maybe it’s time to start planning to ask for your next raise. Or consider the next move on your career path. Maybe it’s time to start planning for a promotion.

Take advantage of the summer lull to recuperate and make a plan as you head into the into the second half of 2017.

Not sure where to start when it comes to asking for a raise or promotion? Fearless Salary Negotiation will show you how to estimate your market value, and has a step-by-step process you can use to get your next raise or promotion.

3D Printing will change everything

The tech world is buzzing about “3D printing” (for some examples, see the links at the bottom of this piece.). I first heard about it a few years ago in the context of printing replacement organs (kidneys, hearts, etc.) for people. More recently, there’s talk about how it could upend the manufacturing world, offer “personal manufacturing”, and shrink the costs associating with prototyping new devices. All these things are true, but the whole way people talk about 3D printing seems short-sighted to me.

The bigger picture is that 3D printing will not only upend manufacturing, but also packaging and distribution. It’ll change how we consume things by drastically increasing the scope of what’s available for consumption 1, and removing almost all of the friction between the creator and the consumer of those things.

There are obviously many potential applications for 3D printing, but the game changer is how 3D printers will impact regular old consumers. I think the best way to illustrate this is with a simple story:

Little Tommy is getting ready for his first day of second grade. The family just finished dinner, and it’s time to start getting ready for bed. But first, mom and dad let him know they need to get all his things together for his first day of school. He needs his uniform (a polo shirt with his school’s logo on it, a pair of kakis, a brown belt, brown shoes), a ruler, some pencils and pens, paper, a notebook, and a messenger bag to carry all of his gear. So they all head to the living room to use the biggest screen (suitable for family-style shopping). They spend some time picking out the stuff he’ll need on (surprisingly agile and still-profitable) Amazon, choosing the “Buy now with 1-Click” option for everything.

Tommy heads off to brush his teeth while they wait on all his new school equipment to be delivered. Once he finishes brushing his teeth, he heads back to the living room, where all his new gear is sitting next to the family’s 3D printer. He puts the ruler, pencils, pens, paper and notebook in his new messenger bag and leaves it by the front door. He doesn’t need to try on his clothes because they were printed to his current specifications 2, so he takes those in his room and drops them on the floor next to his bed.

The next morning, Tommy wakes up, ready for his big day. But his mom won’t let him leave without a healthy breakfast. She tells the house to make Tommy a couple scrambled eggs with cheddar cheese on them, and a piece of wheat toast with strawberry jelly. A few minutes later, Tommy’s breakfast is ready and waiting under the hood of the family’s food printer. Tommy eats up, and then heads off for his big day at school.

This example raises a lot of questions, so I’ll finish this post off with a sort of self-Q&A.

  • Why is Tommy using paper and pencil at school? Shouldn’t he be using tablets or something? He should definitely be using a tablet, or a “smart desk” or something, but I had to come up with stuff for Tommy to take to school and I didn’t want to spend a lot of time thinking about it.
  • Ah, but where’d the materials used in the printers come from?! Well, at first I think 3D printers will be stocked similarly to 2D printers–we’ll buy buckets of a few basic materials and load them into the printer. Eventually, maybe that stuff will be piped into our homes so we don’t have to go get it. And ultimately, the printers will be materials-free like tele porters in StarTrek. I have no idea how this would work, but it seems like this is an application for a mature understanding of quantum entanglement or home-sized particle accelerators or something.
  • How is the stuff “delivered” from Amazon? Digitally, just like pictures, music and movies are delivered online today. Amazon would just send a digital file (“TommysMessengerBag.3DP”) to the printer, and the printer takes it from there. The product is a one-time-use, DRM-protected digital file, which is created by Amazon or another vendor. This will be true for almost everything – companies (brands) will sell digital downloads of their products. In this story, the pencils Tommy bought would be Paper Mate pencils.
  • Why wouldn’t Tommy just design his own pants and print them off? The same reason I don’t grow my own strawberries. But the bigger reason is that brands and styles will still exist, and Tommy has better things to do than try to ape those brands and styles with his own homemade version. This is sort of like asking why I buy Levi’s 514s when I could just make my own at home. I have better things to do.

I’m curious what other questions people might have about this, and I think it’s fun to think about. This is not sci-fi, it will happen. The question is really how long it will take before the story above is totally plausible. I have no idea, but I’m thinking something like 2030. How fast this happens really depends on how well Moore’s law will apply to 3D printing. My guess is it will apply pretty well, so things should start ramping up here in the next decade.

Links to cool stuff about 3D printing

FOOTNOTES: